It’s Critical That We Stop the Temperatures From Rising

It’s Critical

That We Stop the Temperatures From Rising

By João Victor Bittar

Extreme heat conditions occur at a much hotter or more humid temperature than the average for a particular time and place.

These rising temperatures are already happening and are expected to become more common and more severe due to climate change.

Climate change encompasses rising average temperatures and extreme weather events such as droughts and wildfires that may leave land unworkable or uninhabitable. Another issue we are facing is melting glaciers which heat the ocean’s water.

These responses cause the sea level to rise when ocean water advances up shorelines and surges inland during storms. Climate change has also redefined where plants and animals can survive.

Many organisms cannot relocate or adapt quickly enough when warm or cool conditions change their environment. Other organisms, like some viruses, thrive in the altered habitats and can spread. Unfortunately, there is a range of different impacts our world is currently facing.

All of these changes are worsening as humans continue to add heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere through activities that use fossil fuels like oil, gasoline, diesel, propane, coal, and natural gas.

Rising temperatures are bad for our health because extreme heat can overpower the body and cause dehydration, heatstroke, and organ damage. Vulnerable populations are more at risk from the impacts of heatwaves than others, including the elderly, children, and the poor.

Burning fossil fuels have polluted our air quality which directly correlates to wildfires. Wildfire smoke carries fine particles that can penetrate deep into your lungs. Exposure causes eyes to burn, heart and lung diseases, and even death.

As our climate becomes warmer, insects spread diseases and illnesses such as Lyme disease, West Nile, and Zika viruses to new regions. Extreme weather events can cause injuries and spread waterborne illnesses such as wound infections, dermatitis, or conjunctivitis, which could be fatal.

Climate change is bad for water security and has caused floods and droughts, making it harder for farmers to grow good, nutritious food.

Extreme weather has economic repercussions. Worldwide, government officials spend billions responding to extreme weather conditions. We have the technologies, science, and leadership to solve climate change. To avoid the worst consequences of climate change, we’ll need to reach “net-zero” carbon emissions, which means no more carbon is dumped into the atmosphere than is taken out.

The easiest way to reach net-zero emissions is by planting new forests or restoring old ones. Another way is applying new technologies that suck CO2 out of the air or prevent it from leaving smokestacks. No matter how quickly we reduce emissions, the reality is that specific climate impacts are inevitable. Cutting carbon is the only long-term solution. In the short term, we need to adapt.

You can start combating climate change today by creating a water scarcity plan, building more resilient cities or communities, and helping low-income communities. It is so important that we work to stop the temperature from rising. Let’s be the change we want to see and make a difference so we can thrive on our planet.

Extreme heat conditions occur at a much hotter or more humid temperature than the average for a particular time and place.

These rising temperatures are already happening and are expected to become more common and more severe due to climate change.

Climate change encompasses rising average temperatures and extreme weather events such as droughts and wildfires that may leave land unworkable or uninhabitable. Another issue we are facing is melting glaciers which heat the ocean’s water.

These responses cause the sea level to rise when ocean water advances up shorelines and surges inland during storms. Climate change has also redefined where plants and animals can survive.

Many organisms cannot relocate or adapt quickly enough when warm or cool conditions change their environment. Other organisms, like some viruses, thrive in the altered habitats and can spread. Unfortunately, there is a range of different impacts our world is currently facing.

All of these changes are worsening as humans continue to add heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere through activities that use fossil fuels like oil, gasoline, diesel, propane, coal, and natural gas.

Rising temperatures are bad for our health because extreme heat can overpower the body and cause dehydration, heatstroke, and organ damage. Vulnerable populations are more at risk from the impacts of heatwaves than others, including the elderly, children, and the poor.

Burning fossil fuels have polluted our air quality which directly correlates to wildfires. Wildfire smoke carries fine particles that can penetrate deep into your lungs. Exposure causes eyes to burn, heart and lung diseases, and even death.

As our climate becomes warmer, insects spread diseases and illnesses such as Lyme disease, West Nile, and Zika viruses to new regions. Extreme weather events can cause injuries and spread waterborne illnesses such as wound infections, dermatitis, or conjunctivitis, which could be fatal.

Climate change is bad for water security and has caused floods and droughts, making it harder for farmers to grow good, nutritious food.

Extreme weather has economic repercussions. Worldwide, government officials spend billions responding to extreme weather conditions. We have the technologies, science, and leadership to solve climate change. To avoid the worst consequences of climate change, we’ll need to reach “net-zero” carbon emissions, which means no more carbon is dumped into the atmosphere than is taken out.

The easiest way to reach net-zero emissions is by planting new forests or restoring old ones. Another way is applying new technologies that suck CO2 out of the air or prevent it from leaving smokestacks. No matter how quickly we reduce emissions, the reality is that specific climate impacts are inevitable. Cutting carbon is the only long-term solution. In the short term, we need to adapt.

You can start combating climate change today by creating a water scarcity plan, building more resilient cities or communities, and helping low-income communities. It is so important that we work to stop the temperature from rising. Let’s be the change we want to see and make a difference so we can thrive on our planet.

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